Articles about: "siblings"

What’s having three kids really like? UPDATED!


NOTE: This article was originally published when our third child was two weeks old. Now we’re updating it to let you know what it’s really like to have three kids…as we experience it! Keep reading to view the entire post in order, or click below to skip to your favorite section:


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So the Doctor and the Dad recently had another baby. Which, if you’re keeping score at home, means we now have three – count ‘em three – kiddos to cuddle, care for, and contend with.

Before Niña Número Tres came along, we’d heard a lot of stories about what it was like going from having two kids to having three kids. Things like:

  • You’ll need to switch from playing man-to-man to playing a zone defense,
  • Even though you’re only adding 50% more kid, it feels about 500 times harder,
  • They’re totally going to gang up on you, and
  • Two? Three? What’s the difference? You’re gonna’ be just fine.

So now that we’ve actually taken this triple-offspring plunge ourselves, we decided to record some of our own experiences and observations as they happen, so that you too, can discover what having three kids is really like!

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D+D on PBS: Should you care about sibling rivalry?

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Officially, the Doctor and the Dad love all our articles on the PBS Parents website the same. But secretly, we love our newest article the most.

If that fact causes our articles to get in a big, jealous fight with each other over our affections, so be it. We’re not worried about sibling rivalry.

In fact, that’s pretty much what our latest article is all about – learning why you can stop freaking out about the fights your kids get into with each other, and some great ways to help them have fun with each other instead!

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First-borns are smarter Part 2: Act your age

Our last post gave you the real deal about birth order:

First-born kids tend to have bigger vocabularies and higher IQs (mostly because they got a lot more one-on-one interaction with Mom and Dad back when they were the only game in town), while later-born kids tend to develop more creative and less verbal ways to get and keep your attention (mostly because if they didn’t, their well-spoken older siblings would gladly keep it all to themselves).

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First-borns are smarter Part 1: This cite is REAL!

Over the weekend, the Doctor and the Dad read an article on the always-popular BabyCenter blog titled “First-born children are smarter because…” by Joey Lombardi. The post seemed like it might give parents some useful information about if, why and how first-born kids end up smarter than their younger siblings. Unfortunately, Joey seemed to struggle with the research he was discussing – he kept trying to cite this one article that he’s pretty sure he thinks he maybe read at some point (but couldn’t quite remember where), and he ended up saying “don’t quote me” on basically everything he just tried to say.

So the article turned out to be kind of a dud.

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Ask D+D: Is my child regressing?

My two-year-old daughter still sucks her thumb when she is tired and drifting off to sleep. Lately though, she does it during the day, she’s sucked on a younger child’s pacifier at daycare, and she sucks on a toy pacifier that came with one of her dolls. Is she regressing developmentally? Could the fact that I am pregnant and talking about “the baby” a lot be making her want to do “baby” things?
– Mia

Regressing to earlier developmental behavior, like thumbsucking and bottle or pacifier use, is a very common reaction to the news of a new sibling. (Just like increased beer bottle use is a common reaction to baby news for many first-time dads.)

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Product Review: Oonga Boonga

As Melville (sort of) said, it's better to sleep with a sober cannibal than to read with a sugar-buzzed sibling.
As Melville (sort of) said, it’s better to sleep with a sober cannibal than to read with a sugar-buzzed sibling.

If you pick up a copy of Oonga Boonga, written by Frieda Wishinsky and illustrated by Carol Thompson, thinking that you are instead reading Herman Melville’s similarly spelled, semi-autobiographical work Omoo: A Narrative of Adventures in the South Seas, you’re bound to be disappointed in this book’s lack of island exploration, tribal enslavement and swashbuckling activity in general. But if you read it expecting to find a delightful story about the special bond that siblings share, you’ll be totally satisfied.

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